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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Lori Rothman
Anchor FOX Business Network
FBC 08/29/2013
Rothman: Washington Post also out here with a controversial new report detailing how much money the U.S. allocates to it’s 16 intelligence agencies, and what each agent does with the funds. The top secret so called black budget was given to the Post by NSA leaker Edward Snowden, It shows a $52.6 billion budget being allocated to the intelligence community for this fiscal year. Among the top spenders, the CIA, with $14.7 billion dollars
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
FBC 08/29/2013
Rothman continued: the NSA with $10.8 billion and the National Reconnaissance Office with $10.3 billion. Some lawmakers furious about the report, House Intelligence Committee Chair, Mike Rogers, saying quote “Disclosures like the one published today have nothing to do with protecting American’s liberty or advancing other public interests. Disclosures of our capabilities and programs jeopardize the efforts of the American men and women in the Intelligence Community who have dedicated themselves to protecting American lives and interests.”
Kwame Holman
PBS Correspondent
KQED 08/29/2013
Holman: Another major disclosure has emerged from documents leaked by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. The so-called
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Mitchell: you've detailed that it's $52.6 billion, 69% goes to the NSA, CIA and the National Reconnaissance Center. How have you assessed from all that you have been reporting here the value we're getting, the bang for the buck? What are we doing well and not so well? Gellman: Well they have some fairly frank internal report cards here. They talk about where they think
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman continued: they've had successes and where they have critical gaps. Of course, the President and Congress are most concerned about the gaps to start with because there are things that they need to know to do their jobs and they don't know them. For example, there are five of those critical gaps with regard to the North Korean nuclear program, a subject of a great deal of concern to this government. There is no other country that has as many as five. There are others that have three or four. So the whole
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman continued: United States is, has a bunch of blind spots and that worries them. They've had big success in that area as well. For example, they have -- they've used very clever and creative and interesting technologies and operations to find out things they didn't know about North Korea and Iran. The Post has agreed to withhold a lot of those details and they should be withheld because you'd be alerting the other side to what's been found and you better go move it now.
Andrea Mitchell
NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and Host of Andrea Mitchell Reports
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Mitchell: one of the gaps is also Pakistan. We were always told, Oh, don’t worry we know the leadership in Pakistan has control of its weaponry and in fact, there was talk at the time during the Musharraf reign that there was a double key that they couldn't move things without us knowing about it. This seems to indicate that in later time frame, that there are real concerns about where the nukes are.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman: there is. Look, I mean, on the counter proliferation idea, on the worries about nuclear weapons, also biological and chemical, there is one section for Pakistan and one for all other threats. It is the gravest concern the U.S. intelligence agency -- that there is. They can't talk about that in public, they think, because the judgment of success of administrations has been. They need to take what they can get from Pakistan. If they cut off aid and
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman: continued: say, You're not our friend anymore, then they'll have less visibility and less influence there. But if they say out loud in Congressional testimony that we're very worried about Pakistani nukes, that we're worried about the fact they seem to have a program of -- sort of a systematic program of nonjudicial killings and so on, Congress is going to cut off the funds. So what you have here
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman continued: is a disparity between what they really believe and what they say. This is exactly what the transparency at a higher level into the budget allows there to be a public debate. Is their strategy right of knowing there are big problems but still saying, yes, we want to keep paying them? You know, 20 some billion dollars we've paid in the last 12 years.
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